The CCC receives complaints about corrupt conduct from members of the public and public sector agencies, and many of these complaints are comprised of multiple allegations. When aggregated, allegations data provide useful information about perceptions of corruption in Queensland.

It is important to understand that the allegations aggregated via the dashboard have not necessarily been assessed or investigated; for that reason there is no outcome data provided. This means that no inferences or conclusions can be drawn from the data dashboard about the nature of corruption in Queensland or the veracity of individual allegations.

Resources

We've provided some resources to help you use the dashboard and interpret the data.

Our frequently asked questions provide answers to common questions about the corruption allegations data and explain how to operate the dashboard interface.

Our glossary explains key terms used in the dataset.

We have provided an explanation of how Machinery of Government changes are reported in the dashboard.

You can download the raw data and access a video tutorial about using the dashboard below.

A raw data download (XLS) is provided in Excel format if you wish to use the data using your own software.

This video tutorial has been created to assist users understand how to explore the data dashboard.

CCC corruption allegation data dashboard

Video tutorial transcript

Welcome to the Queensland Crime and Corruption Commission’s corruption allegation data dashboard. Here you will find data for allegations of corruption made to the CCC between 1 July 2015 and 30 June 2016.

The corruption allegation data dashboard allows you to focus the data on what interests you. The dashboard starts by displaying the data for all allegations received by the CCC for the 12 month period. You will know this because no elements of the dashboard are highlighted. As you can see, the data is filtered when an item is selected and unfiltered when that item is selected again. To “drill down” into the data, you can select more than one item and the data will continue to be filtered. You can also choose more than one item from a graph or table by holding CTRL while you click.

You may also choose to undo or reset the page by clicking on the bottom left hand side buttons. More information can be seen by hovering over the bars in the bar graph. Descriptions of the categories of alleged conduct and the types of activities related to alleged conduct are displayed. On the bottom right you have the option to share the dashboard elsewhere as well as download an image or pdf of what you have created. Additionally you can view the dashboard in full screen mode. Select again to exit.

Let’s run through an example. As explained earlier, the dashboard begins by displaying all data for the 12 month period. Notice that nothing is highlighted. You may want to begin by selecting a sector. These are selected from the top row. Hovering over the different sectors shows me how many allegations were relevant to them for the 12 month period. Queensland Police had 4308 allegations in 12 months. I am interested in them, so I select that item. Notice that Queensland Police Service is now highlighted. Also notice that the data has been filtered to show only that which is relevant to the 4308 allegations about Queensland Police. Two tables are now missing. This is because Queensland Government department and local government position are no longer relevant.

Next you may be interested in a particular type of conduct. The dashboard displays this in two levels. First, the alleged conduct category in the top left bar graph, which is in order of most to least common. Notice that failure of duty was the most common category of alleged conduct with 903 allegations. The second level is alleged conduct in the bubble configuration where larger bubbles and darker colours represent more common types of alleged conduct. Hovering over the largest bubble, shows assaults/use of excessive force without a weapon as the most common with 713 allegations. Hovering over the bars in the bar graph, I notice there were 457 allegations of misusing information in Queensland Police. I am interested in that so I select that item. Moving to alleged conduct in the bubble configuration, I notice two common types of misusing information in Queensland Police – unauthorised access which has 228 allegations and unauthorised disclosure which has 198 allegations. I am only interested in disclosure of information, so I select that item.

Next you may be interested in exploring the activities that are related to unauthorised disclosure of information in Queensland Police. These are ranked from most to least common in the right bar graph. Notice that the majority of these allegations, 135, occur during information control and management. I am interested in this, so I select this item.

Next you may be interested in looking at the rank of the officer for which the allegation is about. This tells you that 34 allegations of unauthorised disclosure of information in Queensland Police, during information control and management activities, were about Senior Constables. I am interested in this rank, so I select that item.

Also on the lower left, hovering over the bars in the bar graph tell us that 9 of these allegations were received by the CCC in August 2015. To reset and start again, we select reset from the bottom left.

This time perhaps I am interested in Public Service Departments. I hover to see that there are 1309 allegations about Public Service Departments for the 12 month period. I select the sector from the top row and the data is filtered to show that which is relevant to the 1309 allegations. Notice that misuse of authority is the most common category of alleged conduct with 329 allegations. Also notice that the two tables for Queensland police rank and local government position are no longer relevant or shown.

After resetting, I may be interested in local government. I hover to see that there are 641 allegations about local government and selecting it form the top row filters the data accordingly. Notice procurement is the most common activity related to alleged conduct with 74 allegations. Also notice that the two tables for Queensland Police rank and Queensland Government departments are no longer relevant or shown.

Last updated: 06 December 2019
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Topics
Corruption
Corruption prevention
Local government
Police
Public sector
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